Nursery rhyme

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A nursery rhyme is a (usually short and simple, and often funny or absurd) song or poem for children, typically of toddler or preschool age. Nursery rhymes are often violent or politically incorrect in nature, so they can be seen as inappropriate for children nowadays.

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[edit] Spanking-related nursery rhymes

A number of nursery rhymes deal with the topic of corporal punishment, such as:

[edit] Jack and Jill

Jack and Jill

Jack and Jill
Went up the bill,
To fetch a pail of water;
Jack fell down,
And broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after.

(...)

When Jill came in,
How she did grin
To see Jack's paper plaster;
Her mother, vexed,
Did spank her next,
For laughing at Jack's disaster.

[edit] There was a little girl

There was a little girl

There was a little girl, and she had a little curl
Right in the middle of her forehead;
When she was good she was very, very good,
But when she was bad she was horrid.

One day she went upstairs, while her parents, unawares,
In the kitchen were occupied with meals;
And she stood upon her head, on her little truckle-bed,
And then began hurraying with her heels.

Her mother heard the noise, and thought it was the boys
A-kicking up a rumpus in the attic;
But when she climbed the stair and saw Jemima there,
She took her up and spanked her most emphatic.

[edit] The was an old woman who lived in a shoe

There was an old woman who lived in a shoe

The most common version of the rhyme is:

There was an old woman who lived in a shoe.
She had so many children, she didn't know what to do;
She gave them some broth without any bread;
Then whipped them all soundly and put them to bed.

The earliest printed version in Joseph Ritson's Gammer Gurton's Garland in 1794 has the coarser last line:

She whipp'd all their bums, and sent them to bed.

[edit] See also

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